top of page
  • Writer's picturevP

Implement continuous integration and delivery pipelines - Day 97

Hello friends! Welcome to Day 97 of our #100DaysOfAWS Series. Today, we're going to discuss the crucial aspect of modern software development - Continuous Integration and Delivery (CI/CD) pipelines. If you've ever wondered how to streamline your development process, reduce errors, and deliver updates seamlessly, you're in the right place.


Understanding CI/CD: The Basics

Before we jump into the coding magic, let's grasp the fundamentals. CI/CD is like having a personal assistant for your development workflow. It stands for Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery (or Deployment). Here's a simple breakdown:


Continuous Integration (CI): It's like having a team member who checks your code every time you make changes. This ensures that the new code plays well with the existing one. No surprises on the day of deployment.


Continuous Delivery (CD): Once your code passes the CI checks, CD takes over. It automates the process of delivering your application to production. No more late-night deployment headaches.


Setting Up a Basic CI/CD Pipeline

Enough theory, let's get our hands dirty with some practical examples. We'll use AWS CodePipeline, AWS CodeBuild, and AWS Elastic Beanstalk for this demonstration. These services work seamlessly together to create a robust CI/CD pipeline.


Step 1: Setting Up CodePipeline


# codepipeline.yaml
---
AWSTemplateFormatVersion: "2010-09-09"
Resources:
  MyPipeline:
    Type: "AWS::CodePipeline::Pipeline"
    Properties:
      Name: "MyAwesomePipeline"
      RoleArn: "arn:aws:iam::123456789012:role/CodePipelineServiceRole"
      Stages:
        - Name: "Source"
          Actions:
            - Name: "SourceAction"
              ActionTypeId:
                Category: "Source"
                Owner: "AWS"
                Version: "1"
                Provider: "S3"
              Configuration:
                S3Bucket: "my-source-bucket"
                S3ObjectKey: "my-source.zip"
              OutputArtifacts:
                - Name: "MyApp"
        - Name: "Build"
          Actions:
            - Name: "BuildAction"
              ActionTypeId:
                Category: "Build"
                Owner: "AWS"
                Version: "1"
                Provider: "CodeBuild"
              Configuration:
                ProjectName: "MyCodeBuildProject"
              InputArtifacts:
                - Name: "MyApp"
              RunOrder: 1
        - Name: "Deploy"
          Actions:
            - Name: "DeployAction"
              ActionTypeId:
                Category: "Deploy"
                Owner: "AWS"
                Version: "1"
                Provider: "ElasticBeanstalk"
              Configuration:
                ApplicationName: "MyElasticBeanstalkApp"
                EnvironmentName: "MyElasticBeanstalkEnv"
              InputArtifacts:
                - Name: "MyApp"
              RunOrder: 1

This YAML template sets up a basic CodePipeline with three stages - Source, Build, and Deploy. Replace the placeholders with your own values.


Step 2: Setting Up CodeBuild

# codebuild.yaml
---
AWSTemplateFormatVersion: "2010-09-09"
Resources:
  MyCodeBuildProject:
    Type: "AWS::CodeBuild::Project"
    Properties:
      Name: "MyCodeBuildProject"
      ServiceRole: "arn:aws:iam::123456789012:role/CodeBuildServiceRole"
      Artifacts:
        Type: "CODEPIPELINE"
      Environment:
        Type: "LINUX_CONTAINER"
        ComputeType: "BUILD_GENERAL1_SMALL"
        Image: "aws/codebuild/amazonlinux2-x86_64-standard:3.0"
      Source:
        Type: "CODEPIPELINE"
      BuildSpec: |
        version: 0.2
        phases:
          build:
            commands:
              - echo "Hello, CodeBuild!"

This YAML template creates a basic CodeBuild project. Customize the BuildSpec section based on your project requirements.


Step 3: Setting Up Elastic Beanstalk

# eb.yaml
---
AWSTemplateFormatVersion: "2010-09-09"
Resources:
  MyElasticBeanstalkApp:
    Type: "AWS::ElasticBeanstalk::Application"
    Properties:
      ApplicationName: "MyElasticBeanstalkApp"
  MyElasticBeanstalkEnv:
    Type: "AWS::ElasticBeanstalk::Environment"
    Properties:
      ApplicationName: "MyElasticBeanstalkApp"
      EnvironmentName: "MyElasticBeanstalkEnv"
      SolutionStackName: "64bit Amazon Linux 2 v5.4.4 running PHP 7.4"

This YAML template creates a basic Elastic Beanstalk application and environment. Adjust the SolutionStackName based on your application's requirements.


In this extensive guide, we've laid the groundwork for implementing CI/CD pipelines using AWS services. This journey, from understanding the basics to practical coding examples, equips you to enhance your development workflow.


As you embark on your project work in the last leg of our #100DaysOfAWS series, remember that CI/CD pipelines aren't just tools; they're your allies in crafting efficient, error-free, and swift software delivery.


Stay tuned for the final days of our AWS adventure, where we bring everything together in a hands-on project.


*** Explore | Share | Grow ***

10 views0 comments

Comments

Rated 0 out of 5 stars.
No ratings yet

Add a rating
bottom of page